Nights
Nerida 7:00-12:00am

The Word For Today

Why study the Bible 1



'Like newborn babies, long for the pure milk of the word.' 1 Peter 2:2 NAS

Daily Bible study is essential to your spiritual growth.

Professor Howard Hendricks writes: 'When our kids were youngsters growing up, we set up a growth chart on the back of a closet door. As they grew, they begged us to measure how tall they'd gotten and record it on the chart. It didn't matter how small the increments were, they bounced up and down with excitement to see their progress. One time after I measured one of my daughters, she asked me the sort of question you wish kids wouldn't ask: "Daddy, why do big people stop growing?" How could I explain that big people don't stop growing - we just grow in a different direction? I don't know what I told her, but to this day the Lord is still asking me, "Hendricks, are you growing old, or are you growing up?" How about you? How long have you been a Christian? Nine months? Thirty-nine years? The real issue is how much have you grown up? Step up to God's growth chart and measure your progress. That's what the apostle Peter meant when he wrote, "Like newborn babies, long for the pure milk of the word, so that by it you may grow in respect to salvation." Just as a baby grabs for the bottle, you grab for the Bible. The baby has to have milk to sustain its life physically; and you have to have the Scriptures to sustain your life spiritually. So the first reason for studying the Scriptures is that it's a means of spiritual growth. It is God's primary tool to develop you as an individual.'

Soulfood: Hosea 11-14, Luke 2:34-40, Ps 21, Pro 14:17-20

Read more...

Rebuild your integrity



'If I have cheated...I will pay back.' Luke 19:8 NIV

Zacchaeus got rich by taking more taxes from people than his Roman masters demanded, and pocketing the difference. But after he met Jesus, he said, 'If I have cheated people...I will give them back four times as much' (Luke 19: 8 NLT). Consequently, Jesus said, 'Salvation has come to this home today' (Luke 19:9 NLT).

Integrity isn't about regret, or seeking to minimise painful consequences, or attempting to do damage control. It's about honest repentance, making amends and living in a way that guarantees you'll do things differently in the future. Writing about integrity, one pastor says: 'People look around them at promiscuity, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, and mourn its passing. They see officials taking bribes, business leaders demanding kickbacks, investors parlaying inside information into untold wealth, and they lament the demise of integrity. They read about battered wives, jobless husbands, and abused children, and wonder what happened to caring.' The Bible says, 'The integrity of the upright shall guide them' (Proverbs 11:3 NKJV).

Rebuilding your integrity means humbly acknowledging that sometimes your thoughts aren't fit to print, or that you've hurt someone and need to make things right. It's reported that 50 per cent of American Christians cheat on their tax returns; that's roughly the same percentage as those who don't claim to follow Christ! The point is: integrity is who you are when nobody's looking. Job said, 'Does he not see my ways...If I have walked with falsehood, or if my foot has hastened to deceit, let me be weighed on honest scales, that God may know my integrity' (Job 31:4-6 NKJV). Starting today, rebuild your integrity.

Soulfood: Hosea 6-10, Luke 2:21-33, Ps 17, Pro 14:13-16

Read more...

Focus on what matters



'Don't get sidetracked.' Proverbs 4:27 NLT

Many of us fail to move forward, not because we aren't talented, determined or passionate, but because we get 'sidetracked'. God told the prophet Habakkuk, 'Write the vision and make it plain on tablets, that he may run who reads it' (Habakkuk 2:2 NKJV). Unless you have a clearly defined goal and keep it before you at all times, you won't run in the direction you should. As motivational speaker and author Sam Horn said: 'It's hard to stay on purpose, if we don't know what our purpose is.'

In his book One Big Thing, Phil Cooke writes: 'I've never been a fan of the person who invented the "open door policy". Sure, we want to be accessible to employees and co-workers, but at some point it's time to shut the door and get to work. After your next interruption by a visitor, make a note of how long it takes to get back to your previous level of intensity and focus. You'll be shocked at how much time that steals from your day...Too often other people's needs come before our dream. Obviously we need to care for our children, honour our spouses, and deal with our primary responsibilities around our families or jobs. But the first step in achieving our dream is to take responsibility for it. That means scheduling it, and "unscheduling" the lesser needs of co-workers and friends. These daily commitments chip away at our time, and before long our dream gets lost in the shuffle. Stop doing what other people think is urgent, and start focusing on what matters to you' [and to God!].

Soulfood: Hosea 1-5, Luke 2:8-20, Ps 8, Pro 14:9-12

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed